REDEFINE | DAY IN THE LIFE -DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHY featuring Thomas Laskowski

REDEFINE | DAY IN THE LIFE -DOCUMENTARY  PHOTOGRAPHY featuring Thomas Laskowski

“There is only one sun. We can’t all claim to only have one way to use the light, but we can REDEFINE how we choose to express it. “

We love the honesty in your photographs, how do you go about to capture it?

I think it all comes from the belief that real is better than pretty.
I have so many portraits of my kids, and I know that in a world of smartphones every parent does as well. And as much I as love beautiful portraits they almost never make me stop and think. Or reminisce about anything. But I do that a lot with honest documentary images. Candid family photographs bring memories and joy and yeah..sometimes a little sadness as well.

I try to make sure that I’m not affecting the scene. It’s easier with my kids because “ahh…Dad is always with a camera” Nobody cares anymore. My kids just go on with their lives. Is a little tricker when it comes to my clients. Kids stop doing what they are doing when they see me taking pictures, or they sometimes start to do a show for me. Eather way this is not what I want. It’s great to have images of two brothers messing around but not if they do that just for me. So I just don’t photograph them when they do that. I go somewhere else. They very quickly realize that I don’t take pictures when they show off or look at the camera. Plus my session is usually at least couple hours long. So after the first one, no one is usually noticing the camera anymore.

I approach every scene like a puzzle. I know there is a picture somewhere there and I just need to find it. Plus I want to make sure that the image is not only about how the scene looks like. I don’t want to photograph my son running at the beach at sunset. I want to photograph how it feels to be a little boy running on the beach at sunset. I try to look beyond the obvious.

What were the challenges for you in the beginning, in your journey?

I think that beginning of any road as actually much simpler than the rest. We are passionate about what are we doing, have a lot of energy and ideas, and because of that things go rater smoothy. I just use to photograph my kids. Everywhere, doing everything, all the time. Things get a little harder down the line. One you photograph every corner of your house and every possible activity things get a little trickier. (To the point that it’s now sometimes easier for me to get an image that I love when I’m with a client. It’s a new environment, new people, new activities. It’s simpler. )

Also, it’s not easy to be a parent and a photographer simultaneously. When trying to focus on spending time with my kids and photograph them and the same time, I sometimes end up doing none of it. Images are not good enough and I’m not good enough father.

Why are you passionate capturing an honest image?

There is more than one reason. It started very organically. I’m a photographer, I have a camera, due to the nature of my work I spend a lot of time working from home and with my kids. What else is there to do if not to take pictures of them. Couple years ago, I was at my folk’s place, and I somehow gravitated towards to that old green box full of pictures. Going through them I had realized that the photographs I have the most connection to, the ones that mean something to me are not the perfect ones when my family and I stand in line in front of a camera but the ones that my dad took with his old Zenit camera when no one was looking. Not the “stand here sweetie, look at me for a moment” vacation pictures, but the ones where I can see my old home, the old garage in the backyard that no longer exists, the way my old room looks like and my family looking a behaving…normal. My pictures are not the same at that moment. I decided to step away from the traditional family portraits for myself and my clients as well and move to a documentary style photography.

Plus we also live quite a distance from the rest of our family, and as much as we try to stay in touch they don’t really know how our lives look like on the day to day basis. It’s really easy to feel the distance when you see Suzie hugging a laptop while talking to her grandma on Skype or Kostek kissing a webcam. So photographs exist partly because of our family. It’s a way to show grandparents something that they cannot experience. The normal life of the grandkids.

But the main reason is: I take pictures because I believe it’s important. I strongly believe that life is made of regular days. Annoying Monday mornings and busy evenings. And I think it’s incredibly easy to ignore those times. To not pay attention to the boring, regular and mundane but focus only on big family events. But how many weddings, Christmas days and family trips do we really have in our lifetime? Life is what’s happening here and now. There is way more Mondays than birthdays. When you take your kids to school, and you missed the bus or when they leave smudged fingerprints and toothpaste on the clean bathroom mirror. Sundays when they wake up earlier than on school day and won’t let you sleep. Or that split second when they love each other just before they start fighting again, This is what I want to remember and more importantly what I want them to remember. I have a box of pictures from my childhood, but besides that, my memories from when I was a child are really foggy. I don’t want that for my kids. I want them to remember those days in 50 years. So I try to take pictures all the time. Of everything. When they brush their teeth and ride a bike. Playing a board game with mum and doing homework. Sleeping, eating, crying, dancing, reading. I have pictures of them sitting on a toilet, licking a shower curtain, covered in chicken pox, at the doctor’s office, and so on. Basically all the time, every day and everywhere. But only a handful gets published.

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What are the tips you would share with anyone trying to capture their children or subject with a more honest candid way (aim for at least 5, but any are welcome)

Try to think why you are taking a picture. I know we sometimes just want to save the moment, but think about “why”? What is the thing that brings your attention? When your daughter is playing in the sand, don’t just point at the whole situation and shoot. Decide what do you like the most. Is it her feet covered in sand? Her hair being tousled by the wind? The look on her face? Have a strong point of focus and then shoot. Know why you are taking a picture.

Remember what it was like to to be a child. How it felt to do what they do now. With the image of my son on the beach, I have mentioned above I want to capture the feeling of being a four-year-old boy at the beach at sunset. – It’s not every day that he does that. It gets a little dark, he has a lot more freedom the usual, The beach is empty and wide, the sun is slowly hiding behind the horizon, and the waves make this calming sound. I believe it was special, little magical and quite unreal for him. So that’s the image I have tried to take. It’s not about how it looks like.

Get to their eye level. We always look at kids from one perspective. Looking down. And when we take a picture that way, we are just looking “at the scene”, plus we usually end up with photos of the top of their heads. Get down on your knees or crouch down to their height. Don’t just point and shoot. Get to their eye level or even lower. Not only your pictures will be more interesting; as this is not our normal way of looking at kids and it gives us a unique perspective, you also will become more approachable, but more importantly, you will be a part of their world. You will see everything from their perspective.

Just do it more. Funny thing about a photography is that the camera can show you things in a way that you can’t see without it. When you try to take the picture that describes the moment exactly how it is you need to really focus on what is exactly going on. Not only how it looks like but how does it feel. To you, but more importantly to them. And that requires attention, and that allows you to see more. You dedicate this moment to solely looking at them. Nothing else. And that is not something that we usually do during busy days. It definitely allowed me to be more present, to be more in the moment with them and understand them, not only when I’m taking the pictures but also when I put the camera down.

Shoot through moments Do not stop taking pictures simply because you just took one or two. When your daughter is drawing a firetruck on the kitchen table being completely focused on what she is doing, and you want to save that moment; do not take just one photo ( or even just 3) Stay with it. Keep shooting. She may stick her tongue out in a minute or scratch her nose or make that face that she always makes when she is thinking. The photo will be infinitely better, and it only takes a minute of waiting. Shoot through the moment. Take the “safe” shoot and keep shooting for the better one.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST :

Thomas. Father of two. Dublin based documentary photographer.

W E B S I T E | F A C E B O O K | I N S T R A M 

 

REDEFINE | Freelensing feature by Carrine Powers of Jupiter Hue Photography

REDEFINE | Freelensing feature by Carrine Powers of Jupiter Hue Photography

“There is only one sun. We can’t all claim to only have one way to use the light, but we can REDEFINE how we choose to express it. “

When did you first learn about freelensing? Or, when did you first realize you liked it?

The first time I came across the term “freelensing”, I was reading a comment in one of the photography groups I had just recently joined in February of 2016. In situations like this, it would have been nice if would have made note of the artist and the image that inspired me to google how to do it, I would love to give them credit right now. It would also be nice if I could say I read a few things online and went out and created magic right then, buuut that’s not how it happened. In reality, I was scared to even try. As with a lot of things you read on the internet, the scary accounts of possible damage, to my camera and lens, stuck out and didn’t seem worth the risk. However, I kept seeing these dreamy OOF bokeh-holy images, the creation of such beauty being credited to freelensing. Soon thereafter, I was happy to have found and enrolled in an online course that focused on using tilt-shift lens and the freelensing technique to achieve a dreamy, painterly look. I learned a lot was so inspired by the artist, Justyna Butler, and her course that I can honestly say both were a huge influence on how I capture images today.

What were the challenges for you in the beginning, in your journey or figuring out freelensing?

When I first unmounted my lens, which was a brand new Sigma Art 35 1.4, from my brand new Nikon d750, I was a nervous wreck. I didn’t have a second body, or at the time, any other lenses. I had zero extra money to even buy a cheap nifty 50 use just for freelensing. I reeeeally wanted to try freelensing so badly that I was risking what seemed to be EVERYTHING to do it (without our gear we are dead in the water, no?). And boy, was I awkward it at first trying to hold the lens and camera, but I practiced and practiced and soon I got comfortable shooting. That part wasn’t really tough compared to letting go of the rules. It was one thing to admire that dreamy look in another’s work, but in my own, I was frustrated and hard on myself about nailing focus. During these first attempts at freelensing I found standard objects flowers, weeds, leaves to capture. And doing so I learned and became more comfortable holding my lens. Looking back it took longer than I would like to admit to free myself and go for it with moving objects. Once I was able to let go of the constraints of the “perfect focus” I was able to cross the freelesning technique from still-life into my documentary work, capturing my children.

Why are you passionate about this topic?

This technique crossed my path during a rut. Ya know, the lulls and dulls of inspiration. When all the every day, daily images have been taken, all the light of that season explored, and you’re sporting the “been there done that” attitude that kills your drive to create anything. For me, freelensing was a gateway to a creative place where I have been able to breed ideas and techniques together to continue to manipulate my craft, as a way to keep thing fresh and new. Being able to embrace distortion and OOF, slow shutter, in camera double exposure, tilt-shift lens, vintage film lenses, the list goes on – and hopefully, will continue to get longer, I enjoy exploring. When you find that something that really speaks to you, whether it is a project, an online course, another creative mind, a workshop, or a technique (or all the above) it becomes part of your journey and who you are as an artist. Not to say I wasn’t passionate about photography before freelensing, but I can say without a doubt, freelesing bore passion into photography, for me, in such a way that was not there before.

What are the tips you would share with anyone trying to achieve this technique?

If you are just starting out or you have been inspired to come back to the Art of Freelensing a few tips that I feel are pretty fundamental in achieving success are as follows: Unmount your lens from your camera body, set your lens focus to infinity – if your lens does not have an infinity symbol shown – turn the focus ring all the way left. I like to put my camera on live view, for one bc it a larger (= easier) viewing screen and for two the mirror is put into a flipped up position, out of the way so not to hit the end of my lens (especially when I use my Helios; which has a longer contact ring). Position your lens so close to the camera that it IS touching the camera body, most of your image should be in focus when you look at the LV screen, then every so slightly tilt the lens, you will notice the focus changing, added blur and hopefully some light leaks. Because your focus has been set to infinity you will need to move yourself and your camera around to find the slice of focus or light leaks or flares that you desire. The only time I need to adjust my focus ring after it is unmounted is when I want a closer crop of my subject. There is no one way to freelens, these are a few tips that I use that I hope will help you get started. The more you practice the more you will find what is best for you and your art.

CarrinePowers_dearphotographerblog_1CarrinePowers_dearphotographerblog_2CarrinePowers_dearphotographerblog_3CarrinePowers_dearphotographerblog_4CarrinePowers_dearphotographerblog_5CarrinePowers_dearphotographerblog_6CarrinePowers_dearphotographerblog_7CarrinePowers_dearphotographerblog_8CarrinePowers_dearphotographerblog_9CarrinePowers_dearphotographerblog_11ABOUT THE ARTIST

Carrine Powers is a daily life photographer living in Central Florida. She is a momma to 2 daughters, 2 sons, and a step-son. Currently, her work centers around her family, and the occasional client. She enjoys being involved in communities of interest, Photography, school PTA, and other Moms. She and her husband love to travel by road as often as possible, the mountains being a favorite.

I N S T A G R A M 

REDEFINE | THE MAGIC OF COLOR FEATURE BY DANA NICOLE PHOTOGRAPHY

REDEFINE | THE MAGIC OF COLOR FEATURE BY DANA NICOLE PHOTOGRAPHY
Share with us a bit of your approach to the work you do. How long you’ve been shooting + future goals.

As long as I can remember, I’ve always been attracted to vibrant colors. I love all things that glitter and sparkle because they add a bit of magic to everyday life. This is how I approach my photography. I feel like color can transform an ordinary moment into an extraordinary one. I’ve been shooting professionally for about seven years now and have always strived to push the boundaries of color in my images.

Tell us about your use of color in images?

I live in Tampa, FL so I shoot at the beach frequently. The sunsets on the west coast of Florida are nothing short of amazing. I love how the sky can so quickly fade from turquoise blue, to purple, pink and orange hues. Pastel colored skies are my favorite! I am so inspired by those colors that I just love to enhance them a bit to make my images look as magical as it felt to be there at that moment.

Is there a specific color pallet you love? Do you seek out specific colors in your environment?

I also love to play with contrasting colors. For example, I purposely put my daughter in this red dress because I new she would be surrounded by the green grass and trees. I really wanted her to pop! When you look at this image, your eyes will go directly to her. This is an easy technique for playing with colors in your work and I would recommend it to anyone just starting out. Look for bold colors around you and play them up by using a contrasting color.

In the future, I hope to teach my techniques for achieving vibrant colors in my work. I used to teach elementary school before I took up photography full time, so it feels like teaching about photography would be a natural next step for me. Until then, I’ll continue being inspired and embracing the beautiful colors found all around me!

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ABOUT THE ARTIST :

Dana DiSalvo lives in Tampa, FL with her husband and three daughters. She is a natural light photographer specializing in family, children, and maternity sessions.

W E B S I T E | I N S T A G R A M | F A C E B O O K |

P I N T E R E S T 

 

REDEFINE | Underwater Photography with a GOPRO featuring Tessie Wallace Photography

REDEFINE | Underwater Photography with a GOPRO featuring Tessie Wallace Photography

 

“There is only one sun. We can’t all claim to only have one way to use the light, but we can REDEFINE how we choose to express it. “

When did you first learn about underwater photography? did you first realize you liked this topic?

I was first attracted to underwater photography a few years ago, when I saw the work of Lia Barrett online. She works with a family friend of mine and I was blown away by her images. I don’t think I even owned a camera back then but once I got on Instagram last fall, I started seeing underwater images and thought it would be amazing to try it. I also took Summer Murdock’s Magic of Light class and her underwater photography definitely got me researching what type of housing I could purchase for my own camera.

What were the challenges for you in the beginning, in your journey or figuring underwater photography?

I just started underwater photography mid-July, so I’m still learning something new every time I get in the water. I have been using my brother-in-law’s GoPro Hero 4 and I purchased a dome attachment for it. Figuring out the best settings has been a huge challenge for me since you can’t really control the shutter speed and ISO. I did turn on the Protune feature, which gives me some control. But the biggest issue so far has been water clarity. It makes such a difference as to whether your subject is sharp or not. And clean, clear water gives you more options for editing. The light and time of day is also very important since I am using a GoPro. I can shoot on a cloudy day, but the sunlight (or underwater pool lights at night) makes a much more dynamic photo. I just did a shoot at sunset and it was amazing because I was able to get sun haze and major flare, which I’ve never done before. So I’m definitely still learning!

 Why are you passionate about this topic?

It’s just really fun to let go and see what you can capture underwater. There’s a freedom to it because I don’t have to tell anyone what to do. I just play with my son and take a lot of photos. He has finally started swimming on his own and it’s his favorite thing to do, so capturing his joy gives me tremendous pride. I love documenting him on his journey and he loves to see the photos I take, which has driven my passion even more. He is also an amazing subject because he doesn’t blow out bubbles and he swims with his eyes open.

What are the tips you would share with anyone trying to achieve underwater photography?

Just go for it! It’s really fun. You will need to lay flat so your feet aren’t in the shot and wear goggles (even though you can’t always see what you’re shooting if it’s really sunny). Also be aware of your light source and use it to your advantage. Backlighting is hard for me with the limitations of the GoPro, so I usually place subjects looking towards the light. You also need to be closer to your subject than you think – especially with the dome attachment. Editing is where the magic happens. I use a lot of contrast, clarity and some dehaze in Lightroom and then take it over to Photoshop for the skin tone corrections. Clean, clear water is also much easier to edit than cloudy water. But you can get a beautiful ethereal effect from cloudy water as well. I do prefer a moody, dramatic edit, which takes time to do on my computer. But I also really like documentary style photos and so I always edit some of my underwater photos close to the SOOC. They don’t have as much drama, but they capture the connection between my son and me. So many options, just enjoy it!

 

 

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ABOUT THE ARTIST 

Hello! I’m Tessie, a Charleston, West Virginia based photographer who craves color, light, beauty and magic.  I specialize in lifestyle and documentary photography, which includes various portrait sessions as well as labor & delivery, fresh 48 newborn sessions, and underwater mini sessions.  My goal is to capture real moments and connections in an artful way.  I also work alongside my husband as an artist-blacksmith and welder.

 

W E B S I T E | F A C E B O O K | I N S T A G R A M 

 

REDEFINE | Photography + Films feature by Stacey Ilyse

REDEFINE | Photography + Films feature by Stacey Ilyse

“There is only one sun. We can’t all claim to only have one way to use the light, but we can REDEFINE how we choose to express it. “

Why are you passionate about films along with photography ?

These are things that can’t be posed or contrived. But they are also things that may be easily forgotten, lost in the shuffle between activities and milestones. There is something precious about being able to see the moving memory of your life – to SEE the stroke on someone’s cheek, or the way the pullback their hair into a ponytail, the way someone loves another person, or the way siblings squabble… to HEAR the sounds of laughter, the voice of someone possibly no longer with you… the stories about how you met, or the words “I LOVE YOU” ..

When did you start making films for your business?

I officially started to offer films about 1 year ago, May 2016

Has it been a hard sell to clients?

Surprisingly, NO! I know that many have struggled but I feel that films were almost an “obvious choice” for many of my clients. It was something unique, new, and really special. EVERYONE who’s seen them (and especially those who have booked) have understood the value in them almost immediately… even husbands (who generally are hesitant to be in photos, or find it tedious to do a session are on board – or fall in love with a film afterwards if they were not beforehand and have booked another!)

How do you blend photography + films seamlessly ?

Most clients can’t tell the difference between when Im shooting photo or video and they become so involved with being with their families that it becomes easy to switch back and forth. I don’t actually include my still photography INTO my videos – (unless they are for a newborn or fresh 48) I do always include documentary, candid still photography as part of my packages for all video clients – they receive those separately in an online gallery and view them with me during our video/photo in-person reveal – which is SO fun for me to do – I love seeing my clients reactions when they see the films and photographs for the first time – most of them cry!!

Tell us about your film editing?

I create the films using Adobe premiere pro and try to keep my actual footage edits very simple and without many filters or presets, etc.. I want them to look and feel timeless and classic.

What are the tips you would share with anyone trying to start filming? (aim for at least 5, but any are welcome)

Im going to do 2-3 technical and/or 2-3 biz related
Stabilizing your camera is KEY. You don’t need any fancy gear to do it – a good neck strap and steady hands are a must
you don’t NEED to follow your subjects every move, sometimes it is best for them to come in and out a frame… it creates interest and it’s less jarring to the viewer
Create personal work too! I found that my personal projects engage my audience just as much – if not more then my client work. People like to get to know who I am, what my life is like – and see that it is just like their lives – makes me more relatable… Also, personal projects fuel your soul and help you grow as an artist!
I dont think there is any “magic button” that someone can press and POOF clients come running – BUT I do think it is important when you are first starting any new business venture to privately offer to do 1-3 projects gratis to clients or friends that you feel would not only help build your portfolio, but also promote the S**T outta you afterwards. I know there is no guarantee about how it might turn out, but know your audience and know WHY and WHO you are picking for a reason.
DO NOT price yourself too low! These films are HARD WORK – and take A LOT of time to create. If you need to, offer an introductory discount off your ideal price point. This gives your clients the info off the bat that eventually you will be charging XYZ for this service.

What were the challenges for you in the beginning?

1. Balance. It was very hard to find balance between booking photography sessions vs film clients… besides the fall rush, I had almost ZERO photo sessions – video took over my calendar… I was beyond grateful, but also completely overwhelmed by it… I also felt I was losing myself to video and needed to find my photographers voice within all these sessions too!

2. I had to re-wire my brain to see things in video vs photography and ALSO at the same time learn and remember to switch back and forth between the 2 during a session and it was hard at first! – Some of my earlier sessions def did not have as strong a photo portfolio as my sessions do now. I practiced a lot on my girls… which helped. It is seamless for me now – I see the moment in video – take the clip and then flip the switch for a photo…

3. Remembering that IT IS OK TO MISS A MOMENT. There will always be another one!

4. Workflow and music selection were (and sometimes still can be) hard. These films take 20+ hours to create – people don’t realize it… but us video folk are devoted and passionate about our craft.

ABOUT THE ARTIST :

“In a world full of Mary’s be a Rhoda” Stacey Ilyse, a documentary photography & videographer focusing on families and real life moments. Stacey is based in Northern NJ where she pursues her 365 passion project – documenting her life with her 2 little girls, crazy doodle and extremely patience husband.

W E B S I T E | F A C E B O O K | I N S T A G R A M 

 

 

REDEFINE series | Lifestyle, Sunday Morning Sessions featuring Vanessa Brack

REDEFINE series | Lifestyle,  Sunday Morning Sessions featuring  Vanessa Brack

 

“There is only one sun. We can’t all claim to only have one way to use the light, but we can REDEFINE how we choose to express it. “

Why are you passionate about photography in general and a tell us a bit about how you got started?

I have loved photography my entire life and started by photographing my Cabbage Patch kids and stuffed animals in front of our family christmas tree, as most serious photographers do. Later I moved on to photographing pets, landscapes, and the occasional sibling. But seriously, these early experiences fed my artistic curiosity and passion. I’m so grateful to my mother for allowing me to find my own ways to entertain myself because this encouraged my natural creativity.

Tell us about the idea behind Sunday Morning sessions?

Even though I’m very driven professionally, I’ve always wanted to be a mother first and I planned my college and career around it. My kids are in their teens now and I’m so grateful that I focused on raising them and enjoyed every freaking second of my kids’ childhoods. Now that they are older, the pictures I have of those years are so incredibly special to me. After getting more serious about photography a few years ago, I realized that I wanted to capture these memories for other families. I wanted to take their memories, all the gritty and emotional parts of it, and create artistic pieces that they could feel. I want my clients to remember what it felt like to love fearlessly and unconditionally. When we think back on our childhoods, what is more loving and authentic then lazy Sunday mornings with our family? A time and place where you could be yourself and know you would be loved? Or if you didn’t have that, then the desire to provide that for your own children? This is what I aim to capture in Sunday Morning Sessions.

What were the challenges for you in the beginning, how does it connect to your journey and wanting to capture Sunday Mornings.

In the beginning I knew I wanted to photograph people and emotions, but I was uninspired by traditional portraits and editing styles. This may sound strange but I didn’t want to photograph smiles all the time, to me it wasn’t genuine. Parenthood and family is made up of all the emotions, and there is a fair amount of grit involved in loving and supporting each other. As I discovered more creative editing I was able to express the darker beauty in the emotion of family. I continued to focus on this idea of loving unconditionally, something that is unique to families and those we consider family, and used my moody style to reflect genuine emotion in an artistic way.

What are the tips you would share with anyone trying to create a category like this for their work? (aim for at least 5, but any are welcome)

1. Focus on your why. What emotion or feeling takes up your thoughts? What are you always looking for or trying to answer? For me it’s the need to receive and give unconditional love. I find this subject fascinating and impossible to describe with words. What is it for you?
2. Find the editing style that reflects the emotion you want to portray. Clean, bright, and happy or edgy and eclectic or dark and moody, there is no wrong way to do it. There is only the way that works for you.
3. Give yourself time to grow. Work on your style and try to constantly improve.
4. Take a break when you need it. Creativity can be exhausting and there is no shame in pausing your own work to relax and soak up inspiration from other sources.
5. Once you have a clear focus on the category or style you want to create, determine your market and let them know about it. Don’t worry about growing too fast, keep it small at first and focus on quality.

What’s in your camera bag?

I keep it simple as I am not a fan of gadgets and tech. I have what I need to get the job done, which is a Canon 6D and a Canon 35 1.4L that I use all the time.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST : 

I love capturing all the messy, happy, moody, and gritty emotions. My favorite thing to photograph is human faces. I have a day job that I love, and a photography business as well. My free time is spent with my love and our three kids. My hobbies are volunteering/activism, the outdoors, reading, and good television. 

W E B S I  T E | I N S T A G R A M | F A C E B O O K 

REDEFINE | the truth in you lifestyle project feature by Emilie Iggiotti

REDEFINE | the truth in you lifestyle project feature by Emilie Iggiotti

 

“There is only one sun. We can’t all claim to only have one way to use the light, but we can REDEFINE how we choose to express it. “

• Why are you passionate about these type of lifestyle sessions?

I love the idea of spending two hours with one person, and getting to know them on a personal level. I love the intimacy of a photo shoot, the confidentiality of it, the talks, the secrets, the confidences…

• What do you think makes these sessions so unique to your brand/ business?

I always wanted to photograph women, I just did not know about it, and it took me 5 years to finally admit it. I know there are a lot of boudoir, portraits and maternity photographers, but I did not want to be limited to one type of photography. I photograph women the way they want to be photographed.

 How do these sessions compare to other boudoir work ?

I would say it’s a mix of boudoir, portrait and editorial. But most of the time, my clients define the session they want to have. But we usually end up shooting a lot of different images, from the very simple portrait to the very artistic and moody shot.

• What are the tips you would suggest in shooting women in this manner? What is your approach ?

I talk to my clients a lot before the session. I often send mood boards so we know where we are going. I engage a lot with them on the day of the session, it’s like a conversation we have together. I give to my models as much as they give. I am not a person hidden behind my camera, but we are two human beings having a conversation while taking pictures. We laugh, we tell stories, we share a lot.

• What were the challenges for you in the beginning?

My biggest challenge was to explain my vision and my goal. In our society, as women, we are always reminded that we must fit in a box: girlfriend, fiance, bride, mom to be, wife… Women have their picture taken because they need to fit in a box. But what if you want to book a session just because you want to feel pretty or because you want to celebrate your life? Not because you are getting engaged, not because you have a new job, not because you are about to become a mom, but just because you want to do it for you. I am not saying that all these photo shoots are bad, it’s amazing and it’s part of your legacy too. No what I am saying is that we need to dissociate photo shoots from specific roles that we play in life. How about doing a session and just being ourselves, and discovering the truth in you? Whatever that truth is.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST :

Emilie Iggiotti is a lifestyle photographer based in Edmonton, Alberta. Born and raised in France, she started her photography business in 2009, after losing her job as a jurist. In 2011, she moved from France to Canada. She is specializing in women portraiture and has created a unique lifestyle session called “The Truth in You”.

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